8-1 Disney Creativity Process

You first discovered the value of the Outcome Frame in Chapter 2. Now you have moved on to using it with groups. In working with groups, whether internal or external, it can be really helpful to have an understanding of Meta-Outcomes, or the “outcome behind the outcome.”

Here's Jan Prince from the NLP Comprehensive “Portable Practitioner Training” with a demonstration and explanation for you.

Introducing Meta-Outcomes and the Outcome Frame

Demonstration: Meta-Outcomes

Meta-Outcomes Exercise Guide

Review of Meta-Outcomes Exercise

Here's a refresher on the Meta-Model that you learned about in Section One, and Introuducing Charles Faulkner, Senior Trainer and Program Designer for NLP Comprehensive.

Mostly involved in the design and delivery of advanced and specialty programs, Charles also has a wealth of knowledge of the origination and development of NLP.

Meta Model History and Purpose s8-d3-c4

Brief Review of the Well-formedness Conditions of a Well-Formed Outcome s8-d3-c5

T.O.T.E. — A Model For Effective Change s8-d3-c6

 

Disney Creativity Strategy

This process uses perceptual positions and is helpful when you want to create something new or solve a problem. This process can be done individually or as a group.

Get ready: Establish a benchmark of your current state.

  • Identify what you want to create or the problem you want to solve.
  • If there is some discomfort associated with the innovation or problem, using a scale of 1-10 (10 being the most uncomfortable), assign a rating to this feeling.

Step 1: Envision every piece of aspect of the solution.

  • Think of a time when you easily solved a problem or created something. Perhaps you can recall several examples when you were creative.
  • Now, invite your inner Dreamer to join you and have a seat in the imaginary chair that’s reserved for the Dreamer.
  • Tell the Dreamer what you want to do. Explain that you are open to new ways to accomplish this goal – encourage the Dreamer to run wild with possibilities.
  • Allow the Dreamer to dream. Notice what pictures, sounds, feelings, smells, and tastes come up as the Dreamer dreams. Make note of these things.
  • Thank the Dreamer for sharing these ideas.

Step 2: “Try on” different aspects of the solution to create a practical plan.

  • Think of a time when you were easily able to identify ways to implement an idea or solution.
  • Now, invite your inner Realist to join you and have a seat in the imaginary chair that’s reserved for the Realist.
  • Tell the Realist what you want to do. Describe what you want to create or what problem you want to solve – include ideas that the Dreamer shared with you. Invite the Realist to “try on” the different aspects of the solution.
  • Allow the Realist to consider anything that’s critical to implementing your idea. Notice what new pictures, sounds, feelings, smells, and tastes come up as the Realist considers different aspects of the solution. Make note of these things.
  • Thank the Realist for sharing these ideas.

Step 3: Stand back and take second “look” to identify what’s still needed.

  • Think of a time when you were easily able to thoroughly review a solution or idea and find the holes in it.
  • Now, invite your inner Critic to join you and have a seat in the imaginary chair that’s reserved for the Critic.
  • Tell the Critic what you want to do. Describe what you want to create or what problem you want to solve – include ideas that the Dreamer and Realist shared with you. Invite the Critic to evaluate the solution and identify any loose ends that need to be addressed.

Step 4: Integrate input from the Realist and Critic and refine the solution.

  • Invite your inner Dreamer to join you and have a seat its imaginary chair.
  • Present the solution – including feedback from the Realist and Critic. Ask the Dreamer to “try on” the new information to see how it fits with their initial vision.
  • If the Dreamer is completely satisfied, the process is complete. Simply thank the Dreamer and get ready to make the solution a reality.
  • If the Dreamer imagines new things to enhance this solution, notice what new pictures, sounds, feelings, smells, and tastes come up. Make note of these things.
  • Thank the Dreamer for sharing these ideas.
  • Repeat steps 2-4 to make sure the process is complete.

Evaluate:

Recall the feeling that you had when you began this process; notice how it’s different now.

 

Comments (10)

Hi Tom,

I have started experimenting with this technique.

The Dreamer stage is easy for me. I have lots of ideas and thoughts about a project. Then when I transition to the Realist… I just ask questions, rather than provide answers.

Is this normal?

The Critic seems lost after that point so I don’t really get to it.

This is strange for me as I am an analytical person. I would picture myself as more of a realist than a dreamer but this technique seems to be working the other way around for me.

Do you have any tips or advice?

Thanks

Hi Mike,
Yes, the realist may offer mostly questions, the thing is are they useful ones. Are they pointing out new perspectives or elements of the situation you hadn’t thought of yet that want addressing?
If the critic seems lost, you might try changing the sequence and letting the critic have his say before the realist. Try it and see if that helps, ok?
Best,
Tom

Help! As I go through these steps, I get stuck right between the second and third parts of Step 1. I hink of the many, many times that I easily and creatively solved problems, I invite the Dreamer to show up and please help me with the current problem… and no Dreamer arrives. The invitation receives no response. Please help.

Hi Kate,
On the run, my first thought is to make the invitation lighter, more fun. After all, you come up with practical ones already. So invite the dreamer to give you the silliest, most impossible suggestions, to start. Note all of them, and continue the process.
let me know how well that works for you.

Best,
Tom

You suggested the following, which I’ve therefore been trying for about a year and a half, by now:

“ So invite the dreamer to give you the silliest, most impossible suggestions, to start. Note all of them, and continue the process.
let me know how well that works for you.”

It hasn’t worked a bit.
Still NO Dreamer.

Hi Kate,
This may be a little dense to do by text, but we’ll give it a shot out of respect for your persistent diligence. If I understand correctly, you can follow the Realist part of the process, and the Critic part, however you are still not getting the creative or dreamer to manifest sufficiently?

Best,
Tom
PS: Samantha’s comments are spot on, the separation of the ‘states’ or personas is important. In the original creation at Walt Disney studios Walt actually had different rooms for each part of the process. This frees each part to fully contribute.
The team working on a project would physically move from one room to another to build the separation thus enabling full expression of each part in its turn.

Hi Kate,
Sorry to hear you’re having trouble with this. The Disney process is extremely powerful. My take on it, if I may is that when you get in touch with the dreamer, it’s solely time for the dreamer. I must admit that while I have found this book extraordinarily helpful, this process’ steps listed out may be a bit too analytical… there should be a lot more space allowed for it which is why you might be getting stuck. It may be more easily done by simply using the information on page 313-315 of the book.
You see, the dreamer is not concerned with problems. The dreamer creates or discovers a vision where an ideal is seen.
The dreamer is a state that you get into when in mediation- or sitting with relaxed posture, eyes looking up. For me, I tend to access it towards the end of my daily chakra balancing practice. I’ll normally see in a dream like state the outcome desired- and I’ve gotten plenty of ideas of projects to create. And sometimes, I’ll also discover solutions to problems. But again, solutions to problems is a job for the realist or critic… perhaps don’t be as concerned with following the steps as just getting into that dreamlike state.
Hope this helps.
Best,
Samantha

Samantha,
Nicely done!
Tom

The Disney creative strategy is a great technique !! I am an architect and now I come up with the most unique ideas in the room.
Thanks!!

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